Latest News

Last updated 24 May, 11:40 AM

BBC News - Home

IS 'destroyed aircraft' at Syria base - New satellite imagery appears to reveal extensive damage to a major airbase in Syria used by Russia after an attack by Islamic State militants.

Trust to run city's children's services - Birmingham's children's services will be run by a trust after failings which saw the department named "a national disgrace".

Australia to deport mother of five to UK - A mother, who has lived in Australia most of her life, fears ending up on the streets if she is deported to the UK after her release from prison.

UK urged to relax Tunisia travel alert - Tunisian officials urge the UK to relax its warning against all but essential travel to the country, in place after last year's terror attacks.

Fracking approval reignites row - Approval for fracking in North Yorkshire raises the prospect of the controversial technique being allowed at other sites and restarts an intense debate.

The Register

Atlassian cuts Bamboo from the cloud, lays pipelines into Bitbucket - Saves devs from down-time with mobile JIRA and Confluence... Atlassian has further cut off developers’ hopes of some peace and quiet by announcing full mobile apps that will plug them into its key platforms.…

Crappy sandwiches, cantankerous nerds: Put user back in user group - Live from a VMUG? Worth a try... Sysadmin Blog I am going to moderate a webinar today*. The webinar is about the real world implications of copying data and cloning VMs. The interesting bit? We're going to try this with video conferencing, live from the Wisconsin VMware User Group meeting (VMUG).…

Gillian Anderson: The next <strike>James</strike> Jane Bond? - The X-Files star in 007 bid Gillian Anderson has got a her fans all a-tizz down at Twitter with a hint that she might be prepared to fill Daniel Craig's shoes as 007.…

Don't tell the Cabinet Office: HMRC is building its own online ID system - And GDS's Verify still not ready HMRC is pushing ahead with its own plans to build an online authentication portal following the decommissioning of the current Gateway portal in 2018, according to multiple sources.…

Asteroid-sampling spacecraft prepped for September launch - OSIRIS-REx: NASA's greatest improbable acronym NASA's improbably acronmyed* "Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security – Regolith Explorer" (OSIRIS-REx) spacecraft has arrived at Florida's Kennedy Space Center ahead of a September launch on an asteroid-sampling mission.…

New Scientist - News

India’s reusable space plane takes its first test flight - The Reusable Launch Vehicle, which resembles a mini space shuttle, splashed down in the Bay of Bengal on Monday after a successful first launch

Mars was once devastated by giant 50-metre tsunamis - Massive waves once crashed over the shores of the Red Planet, which could explain why we struggle to see its coastlines today

Trees seen resting branches while ‘asleep’ for the first time - Birch branches droop by as much as 10 centimetres at night, and return to their usual positions at daybreak. It’s not yet clear whether the effect is deliberate or passive

5000-year-old beer-brewing kit found in China - Pottery from China has revealed the secrets of some of the oldest known beer makers, who may be linked to the rise of hierarchical societies in East Asia

Monkey seen caring for dying mate then grieving after she dies - The actions of a snub-nosed monkey in China appear to be rare evidence of compassionate care in the wild, hinting that animals may comprehend mortality

Hacker News

CryEngine out on GitHub - Comments

Terms and conditions word by word - Comments

Pastejacking - Comments

Japan adding mandatory programming education to all elementary schools - Comments

Bitbucket Pipelines Beta: continuous delivery inside Bitbucket - Comments

Slashdot

Burning All Fossil Fuels Would Scorch Earth, Says Study - mspohr quotes a report from Phys.Org: A new study published in the Journal Nature Climate Change shows our precarious climate condition: "Using up all known fossil fuel reserves would render Earth even more unlivable than scientists had previously projected, researchers said on Monday. Average temperatures would climb by up to 9.5 degrees Celsius (17 degrees Fahrenheit) -- five times the cap on global warming set at climate talks in Paris in December, they reported. In the Arctic region -- already heating at more than double the global average -- the thermometer would rise an unimaginable 15 C to 20 C." This would make most of Earth uninhabitable to humans (although the dinosaurs seemed to do fine with it 65 million years ago). The report also stated that if fossil fuel trends go unchanged, ten times the 540 billion tons of carbon emitted since the start of industrialization would be reached near the end of the 22nd century. For comparison, "older models had projected that depleting fossil fuel reserves entirely would heat the planet by 4.3 C to 8.4 C. The new study revises this to between 6.4 C and 9.5 C," writes Phys.Org. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Is Tweaking Trending Topics To Counter Charges of Bias - An anonymous reader writes: Facebook has said once again in an open letter to Sen. John Thune, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, that its Trending Topics section is free of any political bias or manipulation. But in response to Gizmodo's report that Facebook employees were suppressing conservative news stories, Facebook is revamping how editors find trending stories. "We could not fully exclude the possibility of isolated improper actions or unintentional bias in the implementation of our guidelines or policies," Facebook general Counsel Colin Stretch wrote. Of course, Facebook is going to train the human editors who work on their trending section; they're also going to abandon several automated tools it used to find and categorize trending news in the past. Recode provides some examples, writing, "[Facebook] will no longer use its "1K list," a group of 1,000 websites it used to help verify headlines." Facebook will also get rid of several top publications, including the New York Times and CNN. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Hacker Phineas Fisher is Trying To Start a 'Hack Back' Political Movement - An anonymous reader writes: The hacker who breached Hacking Team and FinFisher is trying to get more people to "hack back" and fight "the system." For some, thanks to his targeted attacks and sophisticated political views, Phineas Fisher is quickly becoming the most influential hacktivist of the last few years. In response to his most recent hack where he released a 39-minute how-to video showing how to strip data from targeted websites, specifically a website of the Catalan police union, Phineas Fisher told Motherboard, "Everything doesn't have to be big. I wanted to strike a small blow at the system, teach a bit of hacking with the video, and inspire people to take action." Biella Coleman, professor at McGill University in Montreal, believes Phineas Fisher has a good chance of inspiring a new generation of hacktivists and "setting the stage for other hackers to follow in his footsteps." She says he has been better at choosing targets and justifying his actions with more rounded and sophisticated political and ethical views than Anonymous and LulzSec-inspired hackers. Phineas Fisher told Motherboard, "I don't want to be the lone hacker fighting the system. I want to inspire others to take similar action, and try to provide the information so they can learn how." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Acquires VR Audio Company, Launches 'Facebook 360 Spatial Workstation' - An anonymous reader writes from a report via The Verge: Facebook is looking to improve its virtual-reality audio experience with the acquisition of Two Big Ears. Facebook is rereleasing Two Big Ears' "Spatial Workstation" software as the Facebook 360 Spatial Workstation, reports VentureBeat. The software is designed to "make VR audio succeed across all devices and platforms," and Two Big Ears developers will be merged with Facebook's Oculus team of employees. The acquisition of Two Big Ears is being made by Facebook and not Oculus -- the program is branded as a Facebook product, focused on 360-degree video and VR. The Spatial Workstation was first released last fall and was a platform for mixing audio that sounded realistically three-dimensional. Two Big Ears will provide "support in accordance with your current agreement" for the next 12 months to those who purchased a paid license to the old workstation. The company says it "will continue to be platform and device agnostic," not being locked into the Rift or Gear VR. Facebook did not disclose the sum of the acquisition. Two Big Ears was previously partnered with YouTube to help bring 360-degree live streaming and spatial audio to the site. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Researchers Set World Record Wireless Data Transmission Rate of 6 GB/Sec Over 37 KM - An anonymous reader quotes a report from Science Daily: Transmitting the contents of a conventional DVD in under ten seconds by radio transmission is incredibly fast -- and a new world record in wireless data transmission. With a data rate of 6 Gigabit per second over a distance of 37 kilometers, a collaborative project with the participation of researchers from the University of Stuttgart and the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF exceeded the state of the art by a factor of 10. The extremely high data rates of 6 Gbit/s was achieved by the group through efficient transmitters and receivers at a radio frequency of 71-76 GHz in the so-called E band, regulated for terrestrial and satellite broadcasting. The circuits are based on two innovative transistor technologies developed and manufactured by the project partner Fraunhofer IAF. In the transmitter the broadband signals are amplified to a comparatively high transmission power of up to 1 W with the help of power amplifiers on the basis of the novel compound semiconductor gallium-nitride. A highly directive parabolic antenna emits the signals. Built into the receiver are low-noise amplifiers on the basis of high-speed transistors using indium-gallium-arsenide-semiconductor layers with very high electron mobility. They ensure the detection of the weak signals at high distance. The transmission of high quantities of data by radio over large distances serves a high number of important application areas: the next generation of satellite communication requires an ever-increasing data offload from earth observation satellites down to earth. Supplying the rural area and remote regions with fast Internet is possible as shown in the trial. Earlier this year, engineers at the University of Illinois were able to set a record for fiber-optic data transmission, transmitting 57Gbps of error-free data at room temperature. Read more of this story at Slashdot.