Latest News

Last updated 22 Oct, 01:20 PM

BBC News - Home

Ceta talks: EU vows to unblock Canada trade deal - The EU Parliament president says he is optimistic that a trade deal between the EU and Canada can be signed despite last-minute obstacles.

US election: Trump takes aim at First Lady Michelle Obama - Republican candidate Donald Trump has launched a rare attack on First Lady Michelle Obama, saying "all she wants to do is campaign" for his rival.

'Smart' home devices used as weapons in website attack - Hackers used internet-connected home devices, such as printers and web cameras, to attack popular websites on Friday, security analysts say.

Canister found after London City Airport evacuation - A suspected chemical incident that led to the evacuation of London City Airport may have been caused by a passenger accidentally discharging CS gas before check-in, police say.

Security stepped up after arrest over Tube train device - Security is stepped up around the transport network in London, after a man was arrested over the discovery of a suspect device on a Tube train.

The Register

Pacemaker maker St Jude faces new security flaw claims from biz short-selling its stock - This is not the way to get vulnerabilities fixed Security startup MedSec and the financial house backing the biz have published new allegations of security flaws in pacemakers and defibrillators built by St Jude Medical – and again look set to profit from the disclosures in an unorthodox way.…

Judge nailed for trying to bribe Fed with fizzy water (aka Bud Light) - Attempt to steal wife's text messages gets all watered down A judge in North Carolina, US, has been convicted for attempting to bribe an FBI agent to pull his wife's text messages in exchange for two cases of flavored water – aka American light beer.…

Machine-learning craze reaches freelancers: AI skills sought for gigs - Fed up with artificial intelligence hype? The blather is only just beginning Machine learning, Tableau, and user experience design represented the fastest growing skills on freelancing platform Upwork during the third quarter of the year, a finding that makes sense in the context of the accelerating collection of data and the need to present it.…

Today the web was broken by countless hacked devices – your 60-second summary - IoT gadgets behind tens of millions of IP addresses flooded DNS biz Dyn Updated Today a vast army of hijacked internet-connected devices – from security cameras and video recorders to home routers – turned on their owners and broke a big chunk of the web.…

Como–D'oh! Infosec duo exploits OCR flaw to nab a website's HTTPS cert - Pair abused typo blind spot to game certificate authority Two European security researchers exploited Comodo's crappy backend systems to obtain a HTTPS certificate for a domain they do not own.…

New Scientist - News

Mars orbiter spots new crater that may be ExoMars’s lost lander - The lander may have turned off its thrusters too early, meaning it smacked into the ground at high speed with full fuel tanks - and may have exploded

Double star may light up the sky as rare red nova in six years - New observations of a binary star in the constellation Cygnus suggest they may be in a death spiral and will soon collide and explode

Smart lab rats filmed using hooked tools to get chocolate cereal - Lock up your cereal. Rats can learn to use tools, such as hooked rakes, to reach food, and they can even choose the right tool for the job

Shawl thing: Cashmere could soon come from gene-edited goats - No kidding, goats modified using the CRISPR gene-editing method can produce a third more of the precious fibre

Is it time to allow more than two parents on birth certificates? - Changing attitudes, surrogacy and reproductive technology mean it's right that England and Wales reconsider the birth-registration law, says Julie McCandless

Hacker News

1177 BC – When Civilization Collapsed [video] - Comments

The Professor Who Was Right About Index Funds All Along - Comments

Comparison with Other Frameworks - Comments

Update Regarding DDoS Event Against Dyn Managed DNS on Oct 21 - Comments

Japan’s koseki system: dull, uncaring but efficient - Comments


Cisco Develops System To Automatically Cut-Off Pirate Video Streams - An anonymous reader quotes a report from TorrentFreak: Pirate services obtain content by capturing and restreaming feeds obtained from official sources, often from something as humble as a regular subscriber account. These streams can then be redistributed by thousands of other sites and services, many of which are easily found using a simple search. Dedicated anti-piracy companies track down these streams and send takedown notices to the hosts carrying them. Sometimes this means that streams go down quickly but in other cases hosts can take a while to respond or may not comply at all. Networking company Cisco thinks it has found a solution to these problems. The company's claims center around its Streaming Piracy Prevention (SPP) platform, a system that aims to take down illicit streams in real-time. Perhaps most interestingly, Cisco says SPP functions without needing to send takedown notices to companies hosting illicit streams. "Traditional takedown mechanisms such as sending legal notices (commonly referred to as 'DMCA notices') are ineffective where pirate services have put in place infrastructure capable of delivering video at tens and even hundreds of gigabits per second, as in essence there is nobody to send a notice to," the company explains. "Escalation to infrastructure providers works to an extent, but the process is often slow as the pirate services will likely provide the largest revenue source for many of the platform providers in question." To overcome these problems Cisco says it has partnered with Friend MTS (FMTS), a UK-based company specializing in content-protection. Among its services, FMTS offers Distribution iD, which allows content providers to pinpoint which of their downstream distributors' platforms are a current source of content leaks. "Robust and unique watermarks are embedded into each distributor feed for identification. The code is invisible to the viewer but can be recovered by our specialist detector software," FMTS explains. "Once infringing content has been located, the service automatically extracts the watermark for accurate distributor identification." According to Cisco, FMTS feeds the SPP service with pirate video streams it finds online. These are tracked back to the source of the leak (such as a particular distributor or specific pay TV subscriber account) which can then be shut-down in real time. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Russians Seek Answers To Central Moscow GPS Anomaly - stevegee58 writes: Russians have been noticing that their GPS doesn't work in Moscow near the Kremlin. Everyone from taxi drivers to Pokemon Go players suddenly notice that they're transported 18 miles away at the airport when they near the Kremlin. While this may be an annoyance to the public it seems like a reasonable countermeasure to potential terrorist threats. Is it only a matter of time before other vulnerable sites such as the White House or the Capitol in Washington start doing the same? "A programmer for Russian internet firm Yandex, Grigory Bakunov, said Thursday his research showed a system for blocking GPS was located inside the Kremlin, the heavily guarded official residence of Russian President Vladimir Putin," reports Yahoo. "The first anomaly was recorded in June, according to Russian media reports, which have also suggested that the GPS interference comes and goes in a pattern. Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Thursday he did not know why the malfunction was occurring and admitted experiencing the problem himself when driving recently. Peskov redirected questions to Russia's Federal Guards Service, which is responsible for protecting the Kremlin and senior Russian officials." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chemical-Releasing Bike Lock Causes Vomiting To Deter Thieves - An anonymous reader quotes a report from BBC: The "Skunklock" is a U-shaped steel bicycle lock with a pressurized, stinking gas inside. The gas escapes in a cloud if someone attempts to cut the lock. The company claims its "noxious chemical" is so disgusting it "induces vomit in the majority of cases." Even better, it claims, the gas causes "shortness of breathing" and impaired eyesight. The idea, which tries to make stealing a bike as unpleasant as possible, is raising money for production on crowdfunding site Indiegogo. "Our formula irreversibly ruins the clothes worn by the thief or any of the protection they may be wearing," the company claims on its crowdfunding page. Since stolen bikes sell for a fraction of their true cost, replacing clothing or equipment could make the theft more trouble than it's worth. Skunklock says it has tested its foul gas, and it even penetrates high-end gas masks -- though most thieves are unlikely to go to such lengths. But the company said that the compressed gas is perfectly safe -- and can only be released "by trying to cut through it with an angle grinder." If the chemical countermeasure is released, it is a one-time only use, and the lock, which costs over $100, will have to be replaced. But the hope is that the unpleasant experience will cause them to abandon the attempted theft, leaving the bicycle behind. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

WikiLeaks To Its Supporters: 'Stop Taking Down the US Internet, You Proved Your Point' - MojoKid writes: The Internet took a turn for the worst this morning, when large parts of the DNS network were brought down by a massive distributed denial of service attack (DDoS) targeting DNS provider Dyn. If you couldn't access Amazon, Twitter, and a host of other large sites and online services earlier today, this was why. Now, if a couple of additional tweets are to be believed, it appears supporters of WikiLeaks are responsible for this large scale DDoS attack on Dynamic Network Services Inc's Dyn DNS service. WikiLeaks is alleging that a group of its supporters launched today's DDoS attack in retaliation for the Obama administration using its influence to push the Ecuadorian government to limit Assange's internet access. Another earlier tweet reassures supporters that Mr. Assange is still alive, which -- along with a photo of heavily armed police posted this morning -- implies that he may have been (or may still be) in danger, and directly asks said supporters to stop the attack. WikiLeaks published this tweet a little after 5PM: "Mr. Assange is still alive and WikiLeaks is still publishing. We ask supporters to stop taking down the US internet. You proved your point." It was followed by: "The Obama administration should not have attempted to misuse its instruments of state to stop criticism of its ruling party candidate." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

AI Platform Assesses Trump's and Clinton's Emotional Intelligence - FastCompany got an exclusive look at how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump stacked up in terms of their emotional intelligence when analyzed by HireVue's artificial intelligence platform. The platform analyzes "video, audio, and language patterns to determine emotional intelligence and sentiment." The company also partnered with Affectiva for facial analysis "to measure the candidate's emotional engagement correlated down to the micro-expressions level." FastCompany reports the findings: Trump versus Clinton across all three debates. Here we see the range of emotions both candidates showed during all three debates. Clinton seemed to dominate the top-right area, which represented both "joy" and facial expressions like smiles and smirks. Conversely, Trump had a stronghold on the "sadness," "disgust," and "fear" quadrants, along with both "negative sentiment" and "negative valence." The third debate. Looking more closely at just this week's debate, negativity prevailed. Both candidates exhibited disgust during the 90-minute spectacle. Trump, however, seemed to dominate the strongest emotions with heightened scores for "fear," "contempt," and "negative sentiment." Clinton, according to the data, presented the only positive emotional elements, which included some "joy" and "smiles." Clinton's performance. Clinton's range of emotions and reactions seemed pretty consistent throughout all three debates, although she exhibited the most positive emotions during the second. What's more, according to the graph, she was most negative during this week's debate. Trump's performance. Similar to Clinton, Trump's range of emotions seemed relatively consistent throughout the three debates. The third one, however, was when he emoted the most negatively. He smirked a lot during this event, too. "Negative sentiment," "contempt," and "anger" were persistent throughout all three conversations. Read more of this story at Slashdot.