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Last updated 01 Oct, 10:10 AM

BBC News - Home

Body find sparks Alice murder probe - The disappearance of teenager Alice Gross is now being treated as a murder inquiry after a "significantly concealed" body is found.

Cameron vow to protect NHS spending - David Cameron will vow to protect the NHS in England from cuts for five years in his closing speech to the Tory conference.

Defiant HK protests on National Day - Thousands gather in central Hong Kong for pro-democracy rallies on China's national day, despite a call by leader CY Leung to work with Beijing.

Moazzam Begg terror charges dropped - Former Guantanamo Bay detainee Moazzam Begg has seven terror charges against him dropped, including an allegation that he attended a training camp in Syria.

IS vehicles targeted by RAF Tornados - RAF jets fired four missiles at Islamic State vehicles in Iraq overnight, the Ministry of Defence says.

The Register

Windows 10: This one's for the suits, right Microsoft? Or is it... - At least Redmond killed jarring transition between desktop and Store apps Analysis Microsoft is courting corporate types with the newest version of its operating system, Windows 10.…

Gridstore bigs up hyper-converged box: Our storage nodes 'know' what Hyper-V needs - Upstart: Rivals 'not operating at both ends of the pipe' Gridstore has introduced hyper-converged appliances for Hyper-V, including an all-flash variant.…

A moment of brilliance? UPnP for Internet of Stuff lightbulbs - Thus doth tech of future illuminate present, etc Breaking Fad Home automation can be a lot of fun. However, it can also be the cause of an awful lot of headaches. So, you thought those remote control plug sockets from the DIY store were a good deal?…

Microsoft outspends world's tech firms with '€5m' EU lobby bill - And, if you believe these self-reported stats, Google spends just €1.5m... Microsoft spends more than any other tech company in the world on lobbying the EU, if you believe the figures in the non-obligatory EU Transparency Register.…

Cable guy, <i>Games of Thrones</i> chap team up to make <i>Reg</i> 'best sci-fi film never made' reject - Spike TV to make Kim Stanley Robinson's Mars Trilogy It wasn't quite good enough for you lot, but it looks like Kim Stanley Robinson's award-winning Mars Trilogy is set for TV adaptation.…

New Scientist - Online news

The best and worst countries in the world to be old in - Human lifespan is rising fast everywhere, but the Global AgeWatch Index shows that some places do better than other at making the most of their old people

Zoologger: Fickle female guppies fancy fresh faces - What happens at the fishy equivalent of a cocktail party with too many male guests?

Beat temptation with the marshmallow psychologist - We need willpower to resist our desire for instant gratification, but first we need to know our enemy, says Walter Mischel (full text available to subscribers)

How air conditioning overwhelmed its hothead haters - It was a fight between vested interests and institutional boneheadedness, but as Cool: How air conditioning changed everything explains, common sense won out

Chimp social network shows how new ideas catch on - A study of how a chimp trick for drinking water spread throughout the social network is the first time social learning has been seen in wild chimps

Hacker News

Sile, a typesetting system inspired by TeX and InDesign - Comments

Reddit - Comments

Parallel In-Place Merge Sort - Comments

A Fresh Look at Rust - Comments

U.S. Law Enforcement Seeks to Halt Apple-Google Encryption of Mobile Data - Comments

Slashdot

David Cameron Says Brits Should Be Taught Imperial Measures - 00_NOP writes: Children in the U.K. have been taught in metric measures in school since (at least) 1972, but yesterday British Prime Minister David Cameron suggested that they should actually be taught in Imperial measures (which are still in use officially to measure road distances and speeds, but not really anywhere else). Is this because he hasn't a clue about science or because he is catering to a particular political base? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Executive Order That Redefines Data Collection - sandbagger writes: " ...it is often the case that one can be led astray by relying on the generic or commonly understood definition of a particular word." That quote apparently applies to words offering constitutional protections against unreasonable search and seizure. TechDirt looks at the redefinition of the term "collection" as redefined by Executive Order 12333 to allow basically every information dragnet, provided no-one looks at it. "Collection" is now defined as "collection plus action." According to this document, it still isn't collected, even if it has been gathered, packaged and sent to a "supervisory authority." No collection happens until examination. It's Schrodinger's data, neither collected nor uncollected until the "box" has been opened. This leads to the question of aging off collected data/communications: if certain (non) collections haven't been examined at the end of the 5-year storage limit, are they allowed to be retained simply because they haven't officially been collected yet? Does the timer start when the "box" is opened or when the "box" is filled? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Antarctic Ice Loss Big Enough To Cause Measurable Shift In Earth's Gravity - An anonymous reader writes: Contrary to what we were sometimes taught in high school physics, the Earth's gravity is not constant. It actually shows slight variations on different parts of the Earth's surface, and the variations correlate with the density of the material on that surface. The European Space Agency has been measuring gravity for four years, mapping these variations and recording the changes those variations have undergone. Its data indicates "a significant decrease [in gravity] in the region of Antarctica where land ice is melting fastest. Further analysis is, of course, planned so that the whole of Antarctica can be taken into account and "the clearest picture yet of the pace of global warming" can be determined on that continent. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Mysterious Feature Appears and Disappears In a Sea On Titan - schwit1 writes: Cassini images taken in 2007, 2013, and 2014 of one of Titan's largest hydrocarbon seas find that a mysterious feature there keeps appearing and disappearing. Quoting: "The mysterious feature, which appears bright in radar images against the dark background of the liquid sea, was first spotted during Cassini's July 2013 Titan flyby. Previous observations showed no sign of bright features in that part of Ligeia Mare. Scientists were perplexed to find the feature had vanished when they looked again, over several months, with low-resolution radar and Cassini's infrared imager. This led some team members to suggest it might have been a transient feature. But during Cassini's flyby on August 21, 2014, the feature was again visible, and its appearance had changed during the 11 months since it was last seen. Scientists on the radar team are confident that the feature is not an artifact, or flaw, in their data, which would have been one of the simplest explanations. They also do not see evidence that its appearance results from evaporation in the sea, as the overall shoreline of Ligeia Mare has not changed noticeably. The team has suggested the feature could be surface waves, rising bubbles, floating solids, solids suspended just below the surface, or perhaps something more exotic." That the seasons are slowly changing on Titan is probably contributing to the transient nature of this feature. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Are the World's Religions Ready For ET? - Science_afficionado writes: At the current rate of discovery, astronomers will have identified more than a million exoplanets by the year 2045. That means, if life is at all common in the Milky Way, astronomers could soon detect it. Realization that the nature of the debate about life on other worlds is about to fundamentally change, lead Vanderbilt astronomer David Weintraub to begin thinking seriously about how people will react to such a discovery. He realized that people's reactions will be heavily influenced by their religious beliefs, so he decided to find out what theologians and leaders from the world's major religions have to say about the matter. The result is a book titled Religions and Extraterrestrial Life, published by Springer this month. He discovered that from Baptists to Buddhists, from Catholics to Mormons, from Islam to the Anglican Communion, religious views on alien life differ widely. Read more of this story at Slashdot.