Latest News

Last updated 02 Sep, 09:10 PM

BBC News - Home

Islamic State 'kills US hostage' - An Islamic State video purporting to show the beheading of Steven Sotloff, a US journalist abducted by the group, is released.

Ashya's parents freed from prison - The parents of Ashya King are released from prison in Spain after UK prosecutors withdrew a European arrest warrant.

Celebrity leaks 'no breach' - Apple - The leaking of intimate photos of celebrities from iCloud accounts was due to a theft of log-in information, not a security breach, says Apple.

New child abuse victims come forward - Twelve new victims have come forward since a report found at least 1,400 children were abused in Rotherham, South Yorkshire's chief constable says.

FM: Independence 'closer than ever' - Independence is "closer than it's ever been" claims First Minister Alex Salmond, as an opinion polling suggests gains for the "Yes" campaign.

The Register

AMD claims record with latest overclock-happy FX Series chips, again - How's 8.7GHz at 125 watts sound? Plus, eight cores at 95 watts AMD has claimed another overclocking speed record for its latest eight-core CPUs, even as it tries to broaden the market for its chips for gamers and hobbyist customers.…

'Enterprise' ends ten-year mission: Choc Factory's biz services now Google for Work - We never wanted to be a stuffy enterprise seller, sniffs Schmidt Google has celebrated ten years of selling services to businesses by dumping the name Google Enterprise in favor of the touchier, feelier Google for Work.…

'Sony and Twitch' hacking crew Lizard Squad: 'We quit' - OMG, the Feds *Cough* We did what we set out to do The Lizard Squad hacking crew appears to have called it quits over the weekend following a high profile assaults on Sony as well as online attacks on Blizzard and Twitch, a broadcast platform for gamers, among others.…

Good luck with Project Wing, Google. This drone moonshot is NEVER going to happen - Let's game this thing out Comment Google’s delivery drones in Oz have a really easy job – fly across a near desert and lower a parcel to the ground. That’s easy-peasy, matey. Try that in my Sixth Street home in San Francisco, the one near the junction with Folsom Street, where (to make the Chocolate Drone Factory’s life easier) there is a grassed yard.…

NHS supplier Trustmarque seeks backers after accounting change - Rev recognition blamed for 'funding gap' by private equity backer The future of major NHS supplier Trustmarque looks less certain after private equity backer Dunedin confirmed that a change in the way revenue is recognised has created a “funding gap”.…

New Scientist - Online news

Beautiful but doomed: Demise of the passenger pigeon - Hubristic humans should heed the tale of the passenger pigeon's demise, recounted by three books published on the centenary of its extinction

Formula E: Roar power matters for electric racing cars - The scream of a Formula 1 engine, the growl of a luxury saloon: both evoke visceral reactions. Can electric cars do the same? (full text available to subscribers)

Biography of our ingenious species is full of twists - Humans innovate to dodge disaster, and we are pretty good at it, according to The Big Ratchet by Ruth DeFries – but can we do it indefinitely?

Children who skip breakfast might raise diabetes risk - If kids regularly miss out on eating breakfast, they may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, just as adults are

Today on New Scientist - All the latest on newscientist.com: how Jennifer Lawrence leaked from the cloud, proton therapy, idyllic conservation, extreme Ebola measures and more

Hacker News

What I use instead of Google services - Comments

Notes on the Celebrity Data Theft - Comments

Making MySQL Better at GitHub - Comments

Who wrote the text for the Ctrl+Alt+Del dialog in Windows 3.1? - Comments

Gridlock vs. Bottlenecks: A visual explanation - Comments

Slashdot

Banks Report Credit Card Breach At Home Depot - criticalmass24 sends news that multiple banks are indicating Home Depot stores are the source of a new batch of stolen credit cards and debit cards that hit the black market today. "There are signs that the perpetrators of this apparent breach may be the same group of Russian and Ukrainian hackers responsible for the data breaches at Target, Sally Beauty and P.F. Chang’s, among others. The banks contacted by this reporter all purchased their customers’ cards from the same underground store – rescator[dot]cc — which on Sept. 2 moved two massive new batches of stolen cards onto the market." Home Depot is aware of the situation, and says they're investigating. The banks say this breach may have begun as early as April or May of this year and may extend to all 2,200 of Home Depot's U.S. stores. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

David Klann Talks About Using Open Source Software in Broadcast Radio (Video) - David Klann works with Driftless Radio, call letters WDRT, in Wisconsin. This is community radio, with no huge advertisers or morning shock jocks with names like Bobba the Fet Sponge. They use open source software for just about everything except accounting, and that includes processing their audio for both OTA (Over the Air) and online streaming. Their transmitter runs a "stripped down" version of Debian, and David is proud that they had 3 1/2 years of uptime -- that only ended when David did a kernel upgrade that forced a reboot. (Alternate Video Link) Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New HTML Picture Element To Make Future Web Faster - nerdyalien writes: At some point, haven't all web developers spent an unjustifiable number of hours trying to optimize a desktop site for mobile devices? Responsive web design provides a solution: "develop once, works in every device." However, still it downloads multi-MB images and re-sizes them based on device screen resolution. Retrieving optimized images from the server, based on device (desktop, tablet, phone) and the device's internet connection (fiber, broadband, mobile), has always been an open problem. Recently, a number of freelance developers are tackling this with a new HTML element, <picture>, which informs the web browser to download optimized images from the server. The tag will be featured in Chrome and Firefox later this year. Will this finally deliver us faster web browsing on mobile devices and an easier web development experience? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

SpaceX Challenges Blue Origin Patents Over Sea-Landing Rocket Tech - speedplane writes: Last week, Elon Musk's SpaceX fired two challenges (PDFs) at Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin over U.S. Patent 8,678,321, entitled "Sea landing of space launch vehicles and associated systems and methods." The patent appears to cover a method of landing a rocket on a floating platform at sea. In their papers, SpaceX says that "by 2009, the earliest possibly priority date listed on the face of the patent, the basic concepts of 'rocket science' were well known and widely understood. The "rocket science" claimed in the '321 patent was, at best, 'old hat[.]'" Blue Origin has approximately three months to file a preliminary response to the challenge. You can review the litigation documents here and here. (Disclosure: I run the website hosting several of the above documents.) Read more of this story at Slashdot.

NATO Set To Ratify Joint Defense For Cyberattacks - An anonymous reader writes: At the upcoming NATO meeting, according to the NY Times, the 28 member states are expected to ratify "a far-reaching change in the organization's mission of collective defense: For the first time, a cyberattack on any of the 28 NATO nations could be declared an attack on all of them, much like a ground invasion or an airborne bombing." A former NATO ambassador describes NATO's technological capability as "pretty basic" and suggests any counter-cyberattacks would likely be lodged by member states (meaning the U.S. and maybe Britain). He opines, "It's a measure of how far we've come on this issue that there's now a consensus that a cyberattack could be as devastating as any other kind of attack, maybe even more so." Helpfully, the agreement avoids defining what sort of "cyberattack" would warrant an armed response. The Times describes the agreement as "deliberately unclear." Read more of this story at Slashdot.