Latest News

Last updated 26 Jul, 09:40 PM

BBC News - Home

French church attack: 'Priest killer' was being monitored - The suspected killer of a priest in a French church was being monitored by police and wearing a tag at the time of the attack, prosecutors say.

Democrats set for historic nomination of Hillary Clinton - Delegates at the Democratic National Convention are poised to make history, formally nominating Hillary Clinton for president.

Kentish Town restaurant diners struck by unmarked police car - An unmarked police car on an emergency call out crashes into customers sitting outside a restaurant in London, leaving two injured.

Germany must address fears after attacks, says Bavaria governor - The governor of Bavaria urges the German government to address public concerns about security and immigration after a spate of terror attacks.

London City offices evacuated after major gas leak - Hundreds of people are forced to evacuate their places of work as a major gas leak causes chaos in the City of London.

The Register

Citrix's GoTo goes to LogMeIn in $2bn merger - LastPass owner brags about $1bn-a-year sales LogMeIn has effectively taken over Citrix's unwanted GoTo business.…

Anti-theft kill switches in smartphones just got a little less creepy - US peeps now get more control over tracking and remote wipes Some of the largest smartphone vendors and mobile carriers in the US say they have hit a milestone in the use of privacy-friendly anti-theft tools.…

Verizon blames striking workers for dent in sales - Yahoo! is! going! to! love! it! here! Fresh from its $4.8bn acquisition of Yahoo!, Verizon says its sales dropped five per cent year-on-year in its latest quarter, the three months to the end of June.…

Intel soundlessly emits Broadwell Xeon E5-4600 v4 quad-socket chips - She's built like an E5 but handles like an E7 Just because Intel doesn’t make a lot of noise about a product does not mean that it is not important for the company. Rather, it is a gauge of relative importance, and with such a broad and deep portfolio of chips, not everything can be cause for rolling out the red carpet.…

Odds are your office is ill-prepared for network-ransacking ransomware - Cisco cybersecurity report points to dangers ahead Organizations are unprepared for future strains of more sophisticated ransomware, a report by Cisco warns.…

New Scientist - News

Deepest-ever reef survey by divers discovers new fish species - Two marine biologists beat the record for the deepest underwater survey carried out by human divers, investigating a little-studied ecosystem full of new species

Bye bye Philae! Comet team to lose touch with lander for good - The intrepid comet lander is finally going quiet - but you will have a chance to pay your respects

Missing craters on Ceres may have been smoothed by a mud facial - Ceres has surprisingly few large craters for a dwarf planet located in an asteroid belt, but its muddy composition could have wiped away the biggest impacts

Dolly the sheep’s poor health may not have been due to cloning - Four sheep cloned from the same animal as Dolly are all in good health at the age of 9, suggesting Dolly’s osteoarthritis may not have been caused by cloning

New Zealand to wipe out all rats as part of alien eradication - The country’s prime minister calls the NZ$28 million venture to wipe out rats, stoats and possums by 2050 the most ambitious conservation project ever attempted

Hacker News

Let's Encrypt now fully supports IPv6 - Comments

Preliminary NTSB report on Tesla crash - Comments

Employee #1: Apple - Comments

New attack that cripples HTTPS crypto works on Macs, Windows, and Linux - Comments

Skully has crashed and burned - Comments

Slashdot

Harrison Ford Could Have Died In Star Wars Set Incident, Court Hears - An anonymous reader writes: While filming Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Harrison Ford almost died when he was crushed by a hydraulic door on the set of the Millennium Falcon. He was reportedly knocked to the ground and crushed beneath the heavy door when he walked on to the set not believing it to be live. The 71-year-old actor suffered a broken left leg. Prosecutor Andrew Marshall said the door "could have killed somebody. The fact that it didn't was because an emergency stop was activated," he said. The company responsible, Foodles Production, pleaded guilty to two breaches under health and safety legislation, one count under section two of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which related to a breach of duty in relation to employees, and a second under section three, a breach over people not employed by the company. The lawyer for Foodles Production, which is owned by Disney, said the company would contest the level of risk involved on August 22nd at Aylesbury crown court. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Popular Wireless Keyboards From HP, Toshiba and Others Don't Use Encryption, Can Be Easily Snooped On - Reader msm1267 writes: Wireless keyboards made by eight different companies suffer from a vulnerability that can allow attackers to eavesdrop on keystrokes from up to 250 feet away, researchers warned Tuesday. If exploited, the vulnerability, dubbed KeySniffer, could let an attacker glean passwords, credit card numbers, security questions and answers -- essentially anything typed on a keyboard, in clear text. Keyboards manufactured by Hewlett-Packard, Toshiba, Kensington, Insignia, Radio Shack, Anker, General Electric, and EagleTec are affected, according to Marc Newlin, a researcher with Bastille Networks who discovered the vulnerability. Bastille gave the manufacturers of the keyboards 90 days to address the vulnerability, but most vendors failed to respond to their findings. Newlin said only Jasco Products, a company that manufactures the affected keyboard (GE 98614) for General Electric, responded and claimed it no longer manufactures wireless devices, like keyboards. As there doesn't appear to be a way to actually fix the vulnerability, it's likely the companies will eventually consider the devices end of life. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chinese Giant LeEco Buys Vizio For $2 Billion, Gets Instant Foothold In US Market - Chinese electronics conglomerate LeEco is purchasing American TV manufacturer Vizio for $2 billion, the company announced at a press conference in China on Tuesday. The announcement effectively gives LeEco, formerly known as LeTV, an instant foothold in the U.S. television market. For a refresh, for those who haven't heard much about LeEco, it's one of China's biggest electronics companies. Founded in 2004, it offers a range of services including live-streaming, e-commerce, cloud, smartphones, TV set-top boxes, and smart TVs among many other products and services. One of the recent areas where it has invested its time on is an electric car, which we talked about here a few weeks ago. From a report: Vizio is primarily known for its televisions, like the P-Series sets that we recently unboxed, but they've also dipped their toes into Android. For example, Vizio released a 10-inch tablet a few years ago, and the aforementioned P-Series TV set ships with a 6-inch Android tablet that you use as a remote. Once Vizio is acquired by LeEco, it'll be operated as an independent subsidiary and the current management will remain in California. LeEco CEO Jia Yueting commented on the deal, saying, "We hope that we can use the ecosystem model and create a great integration between Vizio and LeEco and create new values for U.S. users."Having talked to the executives of LeEco in the past few months, I understand that the company intends to bring its products to the American market before its rival Xiaomi does. Xiaomi also intends to bring its smartphones and TVs to the U.S. and European market, but is currently dealing with different regulations. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Motorola Confirms That It Will Not Commit To Monthly Security Patches - If you are planning to purchase the Moto Z or a Moto G4 smartphone, be prepared to not see security updates rolling out to your phone every month -- and in a timely fashion. After Ars Technica called out Motorola's security policy as "unacceptable" and "insecure," in a recent review, the company tried to handle the PR disaster, but later folded. In a statement to the publication, the company said: Motorola understands that keeping phones up to date with Android security patches is important to our customers. We strive to push security patches as quickly as possible. However, because of the amount of testing and approvals that are necessary to deploy them, it's difficult to do this on a monthly basis for all our devices. It is often most efficient for us to bundle security updates in a scheduled Maintenance Release (MR) or OS upgrade. As we previously stated, Moto Z Droid Edition will receive Android Security Bulletins. Moto G4 will also receive them.Monthy security updates -- or the lack thereof -- remains one of the concerning issues that plagues the vast majority of Android devices. Unless it's a high-end smartphone, it is often rare to see the smartphone OEM keep the device's software updated for more than a year. Even with a flagship phone, the software update -- and corresponding security patches -- are typically guaranteed for only 18 to 24 months. Reports suggest that Google has been taking this issue seriously, and at some point, it was considering publicly shaming its partners that didn't roll out security updates to their respective devices fast enough. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Obama Creates a Color-Coded Cyber Threat 'Schema' After the DNC Hack - The White House on Tuesday issued new instructions on how government agencies should respond to major cyber security attacks, in an attempt to combat perceptions that the Obama administration has been sluggish in addressing threats from sophisticated hacking adversaries, Reuters reports. The announcement comes amid reports that hackers working for Russia may have engineered the leak of emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee in an attempt to influence the outcome of the upcoming presidential election. Motherboard adds: George W. Bush's Homeland Security Advisory System -- the color-coded terrorism "threat level" indicator that became a symbol of post-9/11 fear mongering -- is getting its spiritual successor for hacking: the "Cyber Incident Severity Schema." President Obama announced a new policy directive Tuesday that will codify how the federal government will respond to hacking incidents against both the government and private American companies. [...] The Cyber Incident Severity Schema ranges from white (an "unsubstantiated or inconsequential event") to black (a hack that "poses an imminent threat to the provision of wide-scale critical infrastructure services, national government stability, or to the lives of U.S. persons") , with green, yellow, orange, and red falling in between. Any hack or threat of a hack rated at orange or above is a "significant cyber incident" that will trigger what the Obama administration is calling a "coordinated" response from government agencies. As you might expect, there are many unanswered questions here, and the federal government has announced so many cyber programs in the last few years that it's hard to know which, if any of them, will actually make the US government or its companies any safer from hackers. Read more of this story at Slashdot.