Latest News

Last updated 22 Oct, 03:10 PM

BBC News - Home

Borrow more to boost building, says Sajid Javid - The cabinet minister says a lack of affordable housing is the "biggest barrier to social progress".

WHO cancels Robert Mugabe goodwill ambassador role - The appointment of Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe prompted a global outcry and wide-ranging condemnation.

Spain Catalonia: Foreign minister denies 'coup' by Madrid - The foreign minister tells the BBC the government is only acting in line with the constitution.

Spain FM: 'Many police violence pictures fake' - Spanish Foreign Minister Alfonso Dastis was speaking to Andrew Marr about the Catalan referendum.

Nuneaton: Police dealing with 'ongoing situation' at Bermuda Park - Warwickshire Police have urged residents to avoid a retail park in Nuneaton due to an "ongoing situation".

The Register

Google's first custom smartphone chip, transferring neural networks across languages – and more - Dive in Roundup Hello, this week's roundup includes AI news from the past two weeks. AI is so hyped, it doesn't help when companies like Intel and Nvidia announce new chips and reveal little information about specs, but make lofty claims of increased speed and precision.…

Plants in SPAAAAAAACE are good for you - A splash of green stops astronauts feeling blue Living in space is grueling. The repetitiveness of daily exercise, experiments, crappy food, and claustrophobia can chip away at an astronaut’s psychological well-being, but scientists have suggested a preventative measure: plants.…

Wanna exorcise Intel's secretive hidden CPU from your hardware? Meet Purism's laptops - Free software lovin' crusaders kick out Management Engine Purism – a San Francisco, California, social purpose company that flies the flags of privacy, security and software freedom – has begun offering its GNU/Linux-based laptops with Intel's Management Engine disabled.…

A plethora of patches, Kaspersky hits back, new hope for Wannacry Brit hero – and more - Everything you also need to know in security Roundup IT admins aren't always fond of patching. It's like going to the dentist – it needs to be done but it can be a pain to do. Sadly, this week there was a lot of patching to be done.…

CEO of $300m-a-year ad upstart Vungle cuffed for allegedly sexually abusing toddler son - SF startup boss denies charges The cofounder of a San Francisco video advertising upstart has been arrested and charged with allegedly assaulting and sexually abusing his three-year-old son.…

New Scientist - News

Volcanoes that spew stretchy ice could make dwarf planets bright - Something strange is happening on dwarf planets Eris and Makemake. They’re tiny and cold, but they still show surprising signs of geologic activity, like real planets

Google’s quantum computing plans threatened by IBM curveball - A mathematical leap has let IBM simulate a 56-qubit quantum computer on a traditional machine, the biggest yet on a classical computer

Dark energy survives neutron star crash test while rivals fail - We saw gravitational waves and light at the same moment from a neutron star merger, which means Einstein was right and some alternative theories are dead

Police body cams were meant to keep us safer. Are they working? - Equipping police officers with body-worn cameras was intended to defuse tense situations, but footage of brutal incidents keeps going viral

Scotland has banned smacking children – so should everyone else - Spanking children doesn’t make them better behaved – but it can put them at risk of mental illness, and should be outlawed everywhere

Hacker News

C++ Tips of the Week - Comments

Deep C (2011) - Comments

Object oriented programming in C - Comments

Getting the Most Out of Sqlite3 with Python - Comments

How Retailers Use Personalized Prices - Comments

Slashdot

With Rising Database Breaches, Two-Factor Authentication Also At Risk - Two-factor authentication "protects from an attacker listening in right now," writes Slashdot reader szczys, "but in many case a database breach will negate the protections of two-factor." Hackaday reports: To fake an app-based 2FA query, someone has to know your TOTP password. That's all, and that's relatively easy. And in the event that the TOTP-key database gets compromised, the bad hackers will know everyone's TOTP keys. How did this come to pass? In the old days, there was a physical dongle made by RSA that generated pseudorandom numbers in hardware. The secret key was stored in the dongle's flash memory, and the device was shipped with it installed. This was pretty plausibly "something you had" even though it was based on a secret number embedded in silicon. (More like "something you don't know?") The app authenticators are doing something very similar, even though it's all on your computer and the secret is stored somewhere on your hard drive or in your cell phone. The ease of finding this secret pushes it across the plausibility border into "something I know", at least for me. The original submission calls two-factor authentication "an enhancement to password security, but good password practices are far and away still the most important of security protocols." (Meaning complex and frequently-changed passwords.) Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A 14-Year-Old Asks: When Should I Get a VPN? - "One of my students sent me this letter," writes Slashdot reader Hasaf. "I have a good idea how I will answer, but I wanted to put it before the Slashdot community." The letter reads: Right now I am 14 years old, I was wondering when I should get a VPN... I was thinking about getting the yearly deal. But right now I really have no need for a VPN at the moment. I was thinking of getting a VPN when I'm in 11th grade or maybe in college. What do you think? Of course, the larger question is what factors go into deciding whether your need to be using a VPN. So leave your best answers in the comments. When should you get your first VPN? Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Microsoft Chastises Google Over Chrome Security - An anonymous reader quotes PCMag: In a Wednesday blog post, Redmond examined Google's browser security and took the opportunity to throw some shade at Chrome's security philosophy, while also touting the benefits of its own Edge browser. The post, written by Microsoft security team member Jordan Rabet, noted that Google's Chrome browser uses "sandboxing" and isolation techniques designed to contain any malicious code. Nevertheless, Microsoft still managed to find a security hole in Chrome that could be used to execute malicious code on the browser. The bug involved a Javascript engine in Chrome. Microsoft notified Google about the problem, which was patched last month. The company even received a $7,500 reward for finding the flaw. However, Microsoft made sure to point out that its own Edge browser was protected from the same kind of security threat. It also criticized Google for the way it handled the patching process. Prior to the patch's official rollout, the source code for the fix was made public on GitHub, a software collaboration site that hosts computer code. That meant attentive hackers could have learned about the vulnerability before the patch was pushed out to customers, Microsoft claimed. "In this specific case, the stable channel of Chrome remained vulnerable for nearly a month," the blog post said. "That is more than enough time for an attacker to exploit it." In the past Google has also disclosed vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products -- including Edge. Read more of this story at Slashdot.

For Under $1,000, Mobile Ads Can Track Your Location - "Researchers were able to use GPS data from an ad network to track a user to their actual location, and trace movements through town," writes phantomfive. Mashable reports: The idea is straightforward: Associate a series of ads with a specific individual as well as predetermined GPS coordinates. When those ads are served to a smartphone app, you know where that individual has been... It's a surprisingly simple technique, and the researchers say you can pull it off for "$1,000 or less." The relatively low cost means that digitally tracking a target in this manner isn't just for corporations, governments, or criminal enterprises. Rather, the stalker next door can have a go at it as well... Refusing to click on the popups isn't enough, as the person being surveilled doesn't need to do so for this to work -- simply being served the advertisements is all it takes. It's "an industry-wide issue," according to the researchers, while Mashable labels it "digital surveillance, made available to any and all with money on hand, brought to the masses by your friendly neighborhood Silicon Valley disrupters." Read more of this story at Slashdot.

US Government Warns Of 'Ongoing' Hacks Targeting Nuclear and Power Industries - An anonymous reader quotes Reuters: The U.S government issued a rare public warning that sophisticated hackers are targeting energy and industrial firms, the latest sign that cyber attacks present an increasing threat to the power industry and other public infrastructure. The Department of Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation warned in a report distributed by email late on Friday that the nuclear, energy, aviation, water and critical manufacturing industries have been targeted along with government entities in attacks dating back to at least May. The agencies warned that hackers had succeeded in compromising some targeted networks, but did not identify specific victims or describe any cases of sabotage. The objective of the attackers is to compromise organizational networks with malicious emails and tainted websites to obtain credentials for accessing computer networks of their targets, the report said. According to the report, the Department of Homeland Security "has confidence that this campaign is still ongoing and threat actors are actively pursuing their objectives over a long-term campaign." Read more of this story at Slashdot.